Stroke

Recognizing a Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia

…you soon. Electromagnetic disturbances can also push those people vulnerable to low respiratory sinus arrhythmia to develop cardiac, arrhythmia, stroke and sudden cardiac death. Electro-sensitive adults and children report cardiac arrhythmias as one of many symptoms they experience with exposure to…

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High HDL Levels Reduce Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

…levels of HDL cholesterol. Researchers believe that higher HDL cholesterol may also protect against Alzheimer’s because it reduces your risk of stroke, and may also help prevent amyloid-ß proteins from accumulating in the brain. Other ways to increase HDL blood levels include: * smoking cessation…

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Beware of Elevated Lp(a) Cholesterol Levels

…the bloodstream increases the “stickiness” of blood, and contributes dramatically to the formation of clots and the chance of a heart attack or stroke. In Europe, the European Atherosclerosis Society now urges doctors to check Lp(a) in patients at moderate to high risk of cardiovascular disease. This…

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Heartfelt Lessons from an American Legend

…of the more life-threatening complications include a blot clot that travels somewhere else (an embolism) and gets lodged causing a heart attack, stroke, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), or clogging of a graft. Kidney failure and congestive heart failure can also result. What are the takeaway lessons for…

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Blood Iron Levels and Heart Disease

…have been accepted only recently. Women and Blood Iron Levels Half of American women will die of cardiovascular problems, including heart attack and stroke, yet risk levels among women vary tremendously. Menstruating women produce estrogen, which is heart protective, and most lose a significant amount…

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The Health Benefits of Drinking Coffee

…studied 173,141 women and 229,119 men for 13 years. All were between 50-71 years of age and in good health. They excluded anyone with a history of stroke, heart disease or cancer. After adjusting for variables like smoking, they found that the more coffee people drank, the longer they lived. The health…

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Treating Your Feet Can Help Your Heart

…Rouleaux formation indicates clumpy, sticky blood and increased blood viscosity, a risk factor for cardiovascular problems, such as heart attack and stroke. The post-foot bath blood analysis revealed red blood cells that were not sticking together; they were flowing freely in the microscopic field. Mildly…

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I'm a Hoosier at Heart

…if you can learn to recognize the triggers of your stress and defuse them, you will be less prone to angina, irregular heartbeat, heart attack and stroke, high blood pressure, and other cardiovascular problems. That’s where your favorite movie comes in. Movies allow you to feel fear, get outraged,…

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Love, Intimacy, and Your Heart

…a good time to address a sticky question that many people don’t want to ask, whether you can safely engage in intimacy after a heart attack or stroke. While sudden death from intimacy is rare, many of my cardiac patients have said they felt vulnerable about their heart. In fact, it's a common fear…

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Learn the Signs and Symptoms of a Heart Attack in Women

…American Heart Association’s website: "Every minute in the United States, someone’s wife, mother, daughter or sister dies from heart disease, stroke or other forms of cardiovascular disease (CVD). And more than one in three women is living with CVD, including nearly half of all African-American…

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On the Road with Dr. Sinatra

…American women are five times more likely to develop heart disease than breast cancer. And, sadly, cardiovascular problems such as heart attack and stroke kill more women annually than any other illness—including all the cancers combined. Clearly, we all need to support any cause that raises awareness…

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Controlling High Blood Pressure Levels

Uncontrolled high blood pressure levels (or hypertension) are a leading risk factor for heart attack and stroke. Often, there are no symptoms, which is why hypertension is called the “silent killer.” You may not know you have it unless you have your blood pressure checked regularly. What Do Blood…

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Walking Club Check-In: 10 Reasons to Walk!

…that nearly 30 percent of adults aged 18 and older reported being inactive. 2. It will reduce your risk of cancer. 3. You'll minimize your risk for stroke. 4. You'll improve arthritis symptoms. Increased muscle strength restores range of motion and flexibility and reduces pain. 5. You'll slim down. When…

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