Are Airport Security Scanners Safe?

by Dr. Stephen Sinatra
Filed Under: General Health
Last Reviewed 02/18/2014

Are Airport Security Scanners Safe?

At this point, I've earned quite a few frequent-flyer miles. Whether I’m headed out for business a vacation or a fishing trip, I always follow my own healthful traveling tips. Plus, lately there’s another travel issue that has me concerned—exposure to airport security scanners.

We all receive radiation frequency (RF) exposure from everyday items at home and at work. But an even bigger source of exposure to RF’s is airport security scanners, and the more you fly the greater your radiation exposure, since RF’s accumulate in your body over time.

What is Your Exposure From Airport Security Scanners?

 Recently, when I was headed to the airport for a television shoot to promote my book The Great Cholesterol Myth, I did my usual side step at the security checkpoint in order to opt for the “pat down” instead of walking through the scanner. As I did, the airport security agent approached to assure me that they had just installed the latest RF-free scanner—the L3 Provision ATD—and that all would be well.  

Skeptically, I gave him the Missouri challenge: I asked him to “show me.” I grabbed my trusty RF/EMF detector from my backpack as it careened down the belt to be X-rayed. Then, I asked that the agent take it into the airport security scanner chamber to see what frequency level it picked up. Remarkably, the detector sensed nothing at all. He was right!  Even the metal in my hip replacement sailed through uneventfully, so I didn’t need the typical wanding.

But, my return trip from San Diego was another story. There, they use the old-style airport security scanners, so both my wife and I opted for the pat down. I’m sure my RF/EMF detector would have had a nervous breakdown there. It would be helpful if the FAA would release guidelines on the various models, what they emit and which airports are using them. Then we could discriminate. But I don’t see that full disclosure coming to settle the controversy about the safety of these devices any time soon.

An Expert Weighs In on Airport Security Scanners

After my trip, I was talking to Dr. Kerry Crofton—author of Wireless Radiation Rescue—about my airport security scanner experience and she wasn’t so sure that any airport security scanner is safe. She said my detector may have registered a false negative on the first leg of my trip if it wasn’t sophisticated enough to detect the wide range of radiation frequencies in the scanning devices.  So, I will go back to joining my wife in the "opt out" line for a pat down until I can get more clarification that any scanner is truly safe.

In the meantime, if you are concerned about your own radiation exposure—whether in an airport, at work or at home—here are some tips for removing RF’s from your body:

  • Drink a detoxifying juice to help your body purge itself of stored toxins.

  • Take a sea salt and soda bath to neutralize toxins. Draw a tub full of medium-hot water and add 2 cups each of baking soda and sea salt. Soak for about 20 minutes, or until the water cools.

  • Use an infrared sauna. As far infrared rays penetrate the body, the transfer of water across cellular membranes increases, improving blood flow and facilitating healing.

  • Get grounded. Earthing will help neutralize the toxic effects of radiation.

 Now it’s your turn: What is your opinion about airport security scanners?

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