Aftermath of Japan: How to Protect Against Radiation

by Dr. Stephen Sinatra
Filed Under: General Health
Last Reviewed 02/06/2014

Today, I’m pleased to welcome a guest blog from a long-time colleague of mine, Dr. Ann Louise Gittleman. For those of you who don’t know her, she’s a highly respected health pioneer, and an award-winning author of more 30 books, including the book Zapped about EMF exposure. I highly respect her work in holistic medicine.

–Dr. Sinatra

 

japanWe’ve all been watching the tragic aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Now we learn that radioactive water is being dumped into the Pacific Ocean–more than 3 million gallons to be exact! 

Here at home, the EPA is thinking about raising the acceptable limits for radiation in our food, drinking water, and soil. According to the Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, that increase would allow the equivalent of a lifetime’s worth of permissible radiation exposure, in a single glass of water. That’s not very encouraging news, especially since the Japanese tragedy isn’t our only radiation worry.

We currently have more than 100 operating nuclear plants in the U.S., with millions of us living within 100 miles of a nuclear power station or military facility where nuclear weapons have been manufactured, stored, or even tested. These plants release slightly radioactive gases and produce low-level radioactive waste.

 

In recent years, there have also been leaks of the radioactive isotope tritium in the groundwater around nuclear plants in Illinois, New York, Arizona, and Vermont. Long-term exposure can lead to cancer risk, birth defects, and genetic damage.

 

What can you do to protect yourself?

  • Sea vegetables—with their high sodium alginate content—are great radiation chelators. Choose from nori, wakame, kombhu, arame, dulse, hijiki, kelp, and agar agar. Many of these foods were fed to the staff and patients of a hospital in Nagaski, Japan when the atomic bomb hit the area in World War II.
  • Miso, which is another great chelator used in WWII, contains a binding agent known as zybicolin which eliminates radioactive elements from the body, maintains intestinal flora, and helps neutralize Cobalt 60 by providing B12. To prepare miso soup: combine ‎1 C. miso paste, 1 C. water, 1 C. olive oil, 1/2 C. chopped shallots or chives or green onions, 1 T. raw honey, and 1-1/2 T. apple cider vinegar. Place all ingredients in blender and blend until smooth. Store in the fridge, and remember that a little goes a long way!
  • Vegetables high in beta carotene aid in boosting immunity and protecting mucus membranes from extreme dryness and reddening of the tissues caused from radiation exposure. Some good choices are kale, carrots, spinach, apricots, and melons.
  • Potassium, calcium, and mineral rich foods help support thyroid function—the gland that is most easily impacted by radiation exposure of any type. Choose from fruit, nuts and seeds, fish, and poultry. 
  • A sea salt and soda bath neutralizes radiation exposure from X-rays, fallout, nuclear plant emissions, and plane travel. Draw a bathtub full of medium-hot water and add 2 C. baking soda and 2 C. salt. Soak for about 20 minutes or until the water cools. 

If you are feeling unusually tired, have more than your share of headaches, and are very achy with nausea, keep in mind that these are also signs of radiation sickness. So, if your usual good health measures don’t resolve your symptoms, consider the salt and soda bath immediately and start drinking “fallout soup” (miso). 

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